Patel, Rajeev | LBJ School of Public Affairs | The University of Texas at Austin
Education
  • Honorary Research Fellow, School of Development Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, South Africa, 2007–14
  • Visiting Scholar, Center for African Studies, University of California at Berkeley, 2006–13
  • Ph.D., Department of Development Sociology, Cornell University, 2002
  • M.Sc. in Economics, Distinction in Social Policy and Planning in Developing Countries, London School of Economics, 1996
  • B.A. in Philosophy, Politics and Economics, Balliol College, University of Oxford, 1995
Research Areas
  • Food Systems
  • World Ecology
  • International Political Economy
Teaching Areas
  • Social Policy
  • Development Policy
  • Policy Communications

Raj Patel is a research professor in the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin and a senior research associate at the Unit for the Humanities at Rhodes University. He studies the world food system and alternatives to it, and is currently working on a documentary project about the food system with award-winning director Steve James. He has testified about the causes of the global food crisis to the U.S. House of Representative's Financial Services Committee and was an adviser to Olivier De Schutter, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Right to Food.

In addition to publications in journals about economics, philosophy, politics, international development and public health, Dr. Patel writes for a range of newspapers and co-hosts "The Secret Ingredient" podcast. His books include Stuffed and Starved and The Value of Nothing. His latest book, co-authored with Jason W. Moore, is published by the University of California Press and entitled A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide To Capitalism, Nature and the Future of the Planet.

Recent Publications
Media Expertise
  • Globalization and International Affairs

Newsworthy

Media MentionJune 24, 2020
Hacking world hunger during the coronavirus pandemic

Global hunger is one of the most dangerous side effects of the coronavirus pandemic. Some of the most vulnerable to hunger live in the world's richest cities, or work in the industries that feed us. In this episode, The Take explores the global food chain's weak links and how some are innovating to help keep people fed. LBJ's Raj Patel joins Al Jazeera's "The Take" to discuss it. 

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Media MentionJune 1, 2020
Coronavirus response: Hacking emergency food supply chains

City figures show the Bronx has a high concentration of frontline workers: people whose jobs it is to man grocery and drug stores, run the public transit system, clean the city and care for its old, young and sick. For many Bronxites, earning money means exposing yourself to infection. "They are the most essential workers right now, and the most disposable," LBJ's Raj Patel told Al Jazeera. "Their hunger should matter right now because you depend on them. The worst is absolutely yet to come.

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May 28, 2020
Food Insecurity in the Domestic and International COVID-19 Context

For decades the number of undernourished people had been declining, but as of 2015 this is no longer the case. Current trends of food insecurity are especially alarming in the context of the COVID-19 global pandemic. Supply chain pressures and international movement restrictions coupled with a global economic crisis are exacerbating the existing food security crisis. What is the policy solution to addressing immediate food needs? What is the broader long-term road map? How does the U.S. balance domestic and global food insecurity pressures? And who are the people at greatest risk of suffering from food insecurity as a result of COVID-19? LBJ Associate Dean Kate Weaver moderates a conversation with LBJ professors Erin Lentz and Raj Patel.

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