von Hippel, Paul | LBJ School of Public Affairs | The University of Texas at Austin
Education
  • Ph.D. in Computer-Based Music Research, Stanford University
  • Ph.D. in Sociology, Ohio State University
  • M.A.S. in Statistics, Ohio State University
  • B.A. in Music, Yale University
Research Areas
  • Evidence-Based Policy
  • Educational Inequality
  • Obesity
Teaching Areas
  • Research and Empirical Methods
  • Social Policy

Paul von Hippel studies evidence-based policy, educational inequality and the relationship between schooling, health and obesity. He is an expert on research design and missing data, and he is a three-time winner of best article awards from the education and methodology sections of the American Sociological Association. Before his academic career, he was a data scientist who developed fraud-detection scores for banks including JPMorgan Chase & Co. and the Bank of America.

Media Expertise
  • Banking
  • Obesity
  • Education Policy
  • Fraud
  • Statistics

Newsworthy

NewsJune 9, 2020
LBJ faculty lauded for achievements during 2019–20 academic year

While this past academic year saw some remarkable changes in the academic process, the continued excellence of LBJ School faculty remained constant. Here is a collection of the recognition that LBJ faculty garnered in 2019–20.

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Media MentionMay 12, 2020
Coronavirus school shutdowns could worsen achievement gap

Experts say school systems will need to be flexible whenever schools restart and should be willing to allow some children to repeat a grade. LBJ's Paul von Hippel sees the potential problems that could arise from an extended lockdown. "Unlike during summer breaks, when schools might ask students to read a few books, many schools are now asking parents to supervise distance learning that is supposed to replicate the classes they are missing.

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Media MentionMay 11, 2020
Covid-19 school closings may spur childhood obesity, experts warn

LBJ's Paul von Hippel is among the experts who discuss the potential for childhood obesity that could arise from kids being away from school during the COVID-19 pandemic.

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