Slick, Stephen | LBJ School of Public Affairs | The University of Texas at Austin
Education
  • MPP, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Princeton University, 2001
  • J.D., University of California, Los Angeles School of Law, 1983
  • B.A., Pennsylvania State University, 1980
Teaching Areas
  • Intelligence and National Security

Stephen Slick was appointed in January 2015 as director of The University of Texas at Austin's Intelligence Studies Project and clinical professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs. Before moving to Austin, he served for 28 years in the CIA's clandestine service, including five assignments abroad. Between 2005 and 2009, he was a special assistant to the president and the senior director for intelligence programs and reform on the staff of the National Security Council. He received a B.A. from The Pennsylvania State University, a J.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law and a Master in Public Policy degree from Princeton University's School of Public and International Affairs.

Media Expertise
  • Contemporary Foreign Policy
  • International Security
  • International Relations
  • Terrorism
  • Intelligence

Newsworthy

Media MentionApril 13, 2021
After nuclear site blackout, thunder from Iran, and silence from U.S.

The Americans and Israelis have worked together in the past to impede Iran's nuclear ambitions, but the U.S. denies that was the case in the latest sabotage.

Read More
Media MentionJanuary 31, 2021
The CIA fine-tunes its hiring pitch to Millennials and Gen Z

The agency is turning to more public tools in a hiring push to expand and diversify its ranks. It runs video advertisements, has an Instagram account, and posts job openings on LinkedIn. It even launched a splashy new website in January whose content includes an advice column and dog-training tips, plus a bold new black-and-white logo.

Read More
Media MentionOctober 17, 2019
Revisiting legacy restrictions on the intelligence community's handling of SIGINT data on non-Americans

Why are U.S. intelligence agencies still applying extraordinary safeguards to the incidentally collected communications of Chinese, Russian and Iranian citizens as well as the nationals of EU allies that refuse to offer similar privacy protections to Americans? 

Read More