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News

2022 USNWR best grad schools: LBJ School of Public Affairs ranks #7

The LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin ranks No. 7 in graduate public affairs schools in the nation, according to U.S. News & World Report's (USNWR) 2022 edition of "Best Graduate Schools," released Tuesday morning.

Feature September 1, 2021

Applications for Fall 2022 entry are OPEN; what you need to know

Entering the public policy arena takes courage, creativity and drive. The LBJ School, ranked No. 7 among graduate public affairs schools in the nation, has a unique combination of spirit, purpose and will that will give you opportunities and show you how to make a difference. Join our community of change-makers. 

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Dean-designate JR DeShazo with incoming students at Gone to Texas 2021
Feature August 24, 2021

Meet JR DeShazo, the LBJ School's new dean

In July, The University of Texas at Austin named JR DeShazo the 12th dean of the LBJ School of Public Affairs, a school producing graduates who are both skilled policy analysts and talented leaders of public and nonprofit organizations. DeShazo comes to the Forty Acres from the University of California, Los Angeles, where he has led both the Department of Public Policy and the Luskin Center for Innovation as its founding director for more than a decade.

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JR DeShazo
News August 19, 2021

Immigrants face inclusion challenges in Austin, analysis shows

As immigrants move to Austin, they may face several challenges. A new analysis from public policy researchers at The University of Texas at Austin shows that although measures of legal support, government leadership and community put Austin at 43 out of the 100 largest cities in 2020 for immigrant incorporation, the city falls below average on measures of civic participation, livability and job opportunities. Additionally, Austin's naturalization rate is one of the lowest among its peers.

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Austin downtown skyline. Credit: Marsha Miller, UT
Feature August 13, 2021

Why LBJ? Incoming students on why they're here, and how they want to change the world

Expert thinkers and doers are always critically important in public policy, and given the remarkable speed of change and the complexity of challenges that we as a society face, the need for dedicated, passionate and well-trained public servants has never been clearer. New LBJ students have answered the call to service in a tremendous way. This incoming class includes more than 250 new master's degree students and nine Ph.D. students.

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Gone to LBJ: Ten new students joining the LBJ School in the 2021-22 academic year
Feature August 13, 2021

Fall 2021 classes focus on topics from intelligence and foreign policy to Black politics and COVID

In many ways, "public policy" world is as varied as the people who practice it. There is no one path to it; thinkers and doers pursue their passion for service for so many different reasons. The LBJ School was founded to improve the quality of public service in the United States and abroad at all levels of governance and civic engagement. We practice this through interdisciplinary scholarship, hands-on experience and a customizable educational experience that allows students to develop unique skills and expertise.

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A student raises her hand during a class

Media Mentions See All
Media Mention September 10, 2021
Suri op-ed: 9/11 aftermath: 20 years of trauma

"We rarely understand a moment until it has passed," writes LBJ Professor Jeremi Suri in a historical perspective on Sept. 11, 2001 in The Hill. "That is especially true in times of collective trauma. Twenty years ago, 19 young male terrorists associated with al Qaeda hijacked four planes in the United States, turning them into missiles that devastated lower Manhattan and the Pentagon. One of the planes, probably aimed at the U.S.

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Media Mention July 15, 2021
Why more women are dying in jails

Michele Deitch said jails and prisons can work to be more responsive to women inside while public officials address systemic challenges women face in society overall that lead to incarceration.

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Media Mention July 14, 2021
Senate committee approves EPA, Commerce nominees

LBJ alumna Alejandra Castillo's nomination for assistant secretary for economic development at the Department of Commerce was approved, moving closer to a full Senate confirmation. Castillo, a '98 graduate, received the LBJ School's highest alumni honor in 2020. 

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Recent See All

News September 10, 2021
LBJ School announces 2021 alumni award winners

Each year, the LBJ School National Alumni Board honors two outstanding alumni for exceptional public service and action-oriented leadership. The 2021 recipients are Shamina Singh (MPAff '97), who received the school's highest alumni honor, the Distinguished Public Service Award (DPSA), and Erol Yayboke (MPAff '06), who received the Rising Leader Award.

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News September 9, 2021
LBJ School partners with Hobby School of Public Affairs to expand data evaluation program to Houston-area nonprofits 

Five Houston-area nonprofits have joined a university-based pilot program to build greater data, measurement and evaluation capacity while providing graduate students with hands-on experience. The program, called CONNECT, is a collaboration between the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin and the Hobby School of Public Affairs at the University of Houston.

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News August 19, 2021
Immigrants face inclusion challenges in Austin, analysis shows

As immigrants move to Austin, they may face several challenges. A new analysis from public policy researchers at The University of Texas at Austin shows that although measures of legal support, government leadership and community put Austin at 43 out of the 100 largest cities in 2020 for immigrant incorporation, the city falls below average on measures of civic participation, livability and job opportunities. Additionally, Austin's naturalization rate is one of the lowest among its peers.

Read More