All eyes are on Latinos in the United States, who became the largest minority voting group for the first time in American history in the 2020 general election. While Republicans experienced the promise of the Latino vote, the Democrats' performance put them at peril. Now questions about the political, social and cultural landscapes seem unresolved. Join the LBJ School for a three-part series on the Latino landscape, unpacking what happened in 2020; demography and what so many people get wrong about destiny; what lies ahead; and the ongoing transformation of what it means to be Latino/a.


WATCH the Sessions

 

  • Jan. 27, 2020: Latinos & the 2020 Election: A Post-Mortem
    Session 1: Latinos & the 2020 Election: A Post-Mortem, with Matt Barreto, co-founder of LD Insights, LLC and professor of political science and Chicano/a studies; Daniela Pierre-Bravo, "Morning Joe" producer and best-selling author; and Dr. Victoria DeFrancesco Soto, assistant dean for civic engagement at the LBJ School, talk about the 2020 election: how Latinos voted and why, what it takes to win, and lessons learned.
     

     
  • March 1, 2020: A Deep Dive — Texas & the Latino Electorate
    Session 2: A Deep Dive – Texas & the Latino Electorate, with political pollster and consultant Chuck Rocha; journalist and cultural anthropologist Cecilia Ballí; and Dr. Victoria DeFrancesco Soto, assistant dean for civic engagement at the LBJ School, talk about the 2020 election: how Latinos voted and why, what it takes to win, and lessons learned.
     

     
  • March 24, 2020: Is Demography Destiny? Latinos, The Census, & What Lies Ahead
    Session 3: Is Demography Destiny? Latinos, The Census, & What Lies Ahead, with Mark Hugo Lopez, director of global migration and demography research at Pew Research Center. He leads planning of the Center's research agenda on international demographic trends, international migration, U.S. immigration trends and the U.S. Latino community. An expert on immigration globally and in the U.S., world demography, U.S. Hispanics and Asian Americans, Lopez was previously Pew's director of Hispanic research, and prior to that served as the associate director. He is the co-editor of Adjusting to a World in Motion: Trends in Global Migration and Migration Policy, and a co-author of The Future of the First Amendment and has contributed chapters to several books about voting and young Latinos.