Texas 2030 Conference Explores Impact of State and National Policy Changes to Trade, Immigration, Border Governance | LBJ School of Public Affairs | The University of Texas at Austin
 

 

The implications of state and national policy changes in the areas of trade, immigration and border governance are the focus of “Texas 2030: Texas in a Changing World Economy,” a one-day symposium hosted by the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin on October 16. Registration is open.

The structure of the Texas economy is significantly different than it was twenty years ago, and it continues to evolve rapidly. Proposed changes in federal and state trade, immigration and border governance policies will have big potential impacts on Texas and its largest and recently growing sectors: oil, gas and mining, wholesale trade, transportation and warehousing and tech-intensive manufacturing and service sectors. These sectors are connected to global markets and Texas’ role as a U.S. export hub. 

Texas currently accounts for 9.2 percent of U.S. GDP with an economy that is disproportionately tilted towards global markets: 16.5 percent of U.S. merchandise exports originated in Texas in 2015. The Texas labor force is equally global with 21.2 percent of its workers born outside the U.S. Approximately 42 percent of these foreign-born workers have been estimated to be unauthorized immigrants.

“This is a major initiative to support policy deliberations that are fueled by bipartisan interest, informed by reliable and accessible information, and driven to create innovative, feasible policy choices. The Texas 2030 Project is intended to help policymakers seeking high quality, objective research on what’s needed to support the future growth of Texas.” —LBJ School Dean Angela Evans

Angela Evans, dean of the LBJ School, announced the inaugural event for this new LBJ School project: “This is a major initiative to support policy deliberations that are fueled by bipartisan interest, informed by reliable and accessible information, and driven to create innovative, feasible policy choices. The Texas 2030 Project is intended to help policymakers seeking high quality, objective research on what’s needed to support the future growth of Texas.”

"Many of the changes to trade, immigration and governance policies currently being discussed at both the state and federal levels have the potential for major impacts on the Texas economy," said LBJ Professor Kenneth Flamm, who will chair a panel on NAFTA and Texas. "The possible magnitudes of these effects on the Texas economy have not been widely analyzed by experts inside or outside of Texas. The LBJ School is proud to have assembled panels that bring leading academic researchers in these areas together with working level implementers and policymakers to explore the possible impacts."

"This symposium marks the beginning of an ongoing dialogue at the LBJ School and among the communities of Texas over the future of our state," said LBJ Professor James Galbraith, who will open the symposium. 

Conference attendees will hear from subject matter experts and distinguished policy thought leaders, including:

  • The Honorable Julián Castro, Dean’s Distinguished Fellow and Fellow of the Dávila Chair in International Trade Policy at the LBJ School, Former HUD Secretary and Mayor of San Antonio
  • Representative Byron Cook (R–Corsicana), Chairman, State Affairs Committee
  • Austin Mayor Steve Adler

The event will be live streamed on the LBJ School Facebook page. The conference is open to the public with limited capacity seating. Registration is required.

The LBJ School, one of the nation’s top public affairs schools, makes a difference, not only within the walls of academia, but also in the public and social dialogue of the world. Contributing viable solutions to society is the LBJ School’s legacy and its benchmark. Its effectiveness in channeling the purpose and passion of students into professional careers is evident in the success of more than 4,000 graduates who are the living legacy of President Johnson’s bold and fearless action. For more, visit lbj.utexas.edu.