Update: View presentations from event on YouTube

 

AUSTIN, Texas, April 4, 2017 – LBJ School professor and founding coordinator of the Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Project (NPPP) Alan Kuperman will host an event on nuclear security to provide lessons for the Trump Administration and honor the 10th anniversary of the passing of nuclear security and safety champion Paul Leventhal. The event will take place April 13 at the LBJ Washington Center, and will be livestreamed and archived here.

“The top U.S. officials on nuclear proliferation are both Texans—Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, a UT Austin grad, and Energy Secretary Rick Perry who is our former governor—so it is especially appropriate that The University of Texas provide guidance for the Trump Administration’s nuclear policy,” Kuperman said.

The event will feature experts with bipartisan experience, including former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for Political Military Affairs in the Bush (41) and Clinton Administrations Robert L. Gallucci, former Commissioner of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the Ford, Carter and Reagan Administrations Victor Gilinsky and Senior Scientist in the Global Security Program at the Union of Concerned Scientists Edwin Lyman.

“The top U.S. officials on nuclear proliferation are both Texans—Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, a UT Austin grad, and Energy Secretary Rick Perry who is our former governor—so it is especially appropriate that The University of Texas provide guidance for the Trump Administration’s nuclear policy.” —Alan Kuperman

These experts will explore how to better secure nuclear facilities, the risks of using plutonium for energy, the U.S. failure to prevent India’s proliferation and halting the U.S. Navy’s use of bomb-grade uranium for propulsion.

Paul Leventhal, a senior U.S. Senate staffer and founder of the Nuclear Control Institute in Washington, worked for three decades to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. Leventhal was integral to the investigations and legislation that resulted in passage of two landmark nuclear laws: The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, which created the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act of 1978, which established stricter controls on U.S. nuclear trade. [Read about the newly established Paul L. Leventhal Fellowship Program Endowment.]

“Paul Leventhal was a relentless fighter for the public interest—both in and out of government—and is thus an inspiration for LBJ students,” Kuperman said. “In his honor, the NPPP annually funds a Paul Leventhal Fellow to pursue a career in nuclear security.” 

Harry Kim, MGPS ’18 and NPPP’s upcoming Paul Leventhal Fellow, hopes to dedicate his career to the disarmament of the North Korean nuclear program and prevention of nuclear proliferation among East Asian countries. 

“I first met Dr. Alan J. Kuperman in his Nuclear Nonproliferation Policy class as a Master's candidate in the Fall 2016 semester,” Kim said. “Dr. Kuperman deepened my understanding of the policy and technical aspects of international efforts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons to additional countries. For my class project, I also researched nuclear proliferation risks in East Asia, which involved great opportunities to have conversations with prominent nonproliferation experts such as Mr. Henry Sokolski of Nonproliferation Policy Education Center and Dr. James M. Acton of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.” 

“Dr. Kuperman deepened my understanding of the policy and technical aspects of international efforts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons to additional countries. For my class project, I also researched nuclear proliferation risks in East Asia, which involved great opportunities to have conversations with prominent nonproliferation experts..." —Harry Kim, MGPS '18

MGPS '16 student Hannah Alberts and summer 2014 Paul L. Leventhal Fellow said, "I am extremely grateful for the support that the Paul L. Leventhal Fellowship provided, which allowed me to pursue an unpaid internship with the Russia-Eurasia Program at the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS) in Washington, DC. The opportunity to perform substantive research in my area of interest at IISS and the perspective I gained on the broader Russia-focused policy community in Washington were invaluable to my professional development. Without the support of the Leventhal Fellowship, I would not have been able to take advantage of this critical opportunity to focus my career goals, improve my professional skill set, and develop a lasting network."

The NPPP engages in research, debate and public education to ensure that civilian applications of nuclear technology do not foster the spread of nuclear weapons to states or terrorist groups. Kuperman, NPPP founder, has worked on reducing the proliferation and terrorism risks associated with civilian nuclear applications since 1987.

Learn more about the event. 

Professor Kuperman will teach a two-semester Policy Research Project on a nuclear nonproliferation topic beginning in Fall 2017. The project will entail overseas field research by students.

Subscribe to NPPP updates or learn more about upcoming NPPP events.